Ricardo McRae

Ricardo McRae

(647) 885-4121

Financial Professional

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New Year, New (Financial) You!

January 23, 2019

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Why you need life insurance (even if you’re young)

December 17, 2018

Why you need life insurance (even if you’re young)

Figuring out how to budget your money when you’re young and don’t have much is always a challenge.

It’s understandable if you feel like you can only handle the basics of survival – like food and shelter – and figure you can postpone things like setting up life insurance until you have a family who depends on you to provide for them.

In fact, that’s how most people think.

A 2017 survey conducted for TD[i] showed that 55% of Millennials do not have any life insurance at all, even though one third of them have thought about it.

The young respondents said the main reason they didn’t have life insurance was the cost (55%), and the second reason was that they didn’t have any dependents (37%).

But as so often happens in life, thinking a certain way doesn’t mean it’s based in reality.

In fact, there are three important reasons why you should consider life insurance when you’re still young:

1. You may pay less money over your lifetime if you buy young. It turns out that there is a direct correlation between the cost of life insurance and the age that you buy it. The younger you are when you buy your policy, the cheaper the monthly premiums will probably be. Not only that, but you may be able to lock in that lower price for longer. (Keep in mind that premiums for term life insurance normally increase in increments, such as every 10 years.) 2. You protect the people you care about when you buy life insurance early. Nobody can guarantee tomorrow – an illness or accident can claim you at any age. What would become of the people you care about if the worst were to happen and you had no insurance? One thing to keep in mind is that if you were to pass away, your debt does not get wiped out. For example, have your parents co-signed for your student loan, or a loan to purchase your car or house? They would be obligated to pay the entire amount borrowed. Your life insurance policy can give them relief from having to absorb all of your debt-load. 3. You may avoid risk of not being able to get insurance later. If you purchase life insurance when you’re young and healthy, and you keep up with your premiums, you can potentially have insurance for life. If you think you’ll wait until you’re settled down with a partner and have children, what would happen if you’re diagnosed with a serious illness in the meantime that may make you too big of an insurance risk? You may find that you can’t get the insurance you need (or can’t afford it).

As the survey showed, most young people think that life insurance exists mainly to cover the one-time cost of a funeral without realizing all of its other implications.

If you’re considering life insurance, research your options and consider your unique needs. Then speak with a licensed insurance agent who can help customize a policy to your individual situation.


[i] https://environicsresearch.com/insights/life-insurance-ultimate-financial-adulting/

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How inflation can affect your savings

October 1, 2018

How inflation can affect your savings

Even before we leave childhood behind, we become aware of a decrease in buying power.

It seems like that candy bar in the check-out lane has doubled in price without doubling in size. Unlike the value of stocks, real estate, or similar assets, candy doesn’t appreciate in value. What has happened is that your money has depreciated in value. Inflation has a sneaky way of eating away our money over time, forcing us to either find a way to earn more – or to get by with less. Even for the youngest of Generation Z, now in their early teens, consumer prices have increased about 30% since they were born.[i]

In 2018, the average new car costs $33,464 – up $1,034 since the previous year, or about 3.2%.[ii] While a $1,034 increase in a single year might seem high, the inflation rate (as a percentage) is lower than for many other items. And some other items may not have gone up as much as you would expect. For example, in 1935, a dozen eggs cost about 31 cents. By 2008, the average cost was about $2.57.[iii] But if eggs had followed the average rate of inflation, the price for a dozen would be nearly $6.00 by now. Supply, demand, and more efficient production and distribution all contribute to a lower price than expected with the egg example. The Canadian government uses what is called a Consumer Price Index (CPI) to measure inflation, but many say it still does not truly reflect the modern cost of living[iv] – making the true rate of inflation more difficult to determine.

Inflation is due to several reasons, all with complex relationships to each other. At the heart of the matter is money supply. If there is more money in circulation, prices go up. Under the current monetary system, which utilizes a Central Bank to govern monetary policy, inflation rates have been as low as 0% annually in 1961 to 12.2% in 1981.[v] That means something that cost $10 in 1980 cost $11.22 just a year later. That may not seem like a big increase on $10, but if you’re like most people, your pay probably doesn’t go up 12.2% in a year for doing the same work!

How does inflation affect my savings strategy?
It’s a good idea to always keep the current rate of inflation in the back of your mind. As of July, 2018, it was about 2.99%.[vi] Interest rates paid by banks and GICs are usually lower than the inflation rate, which might mean you’ll lose money if you leave most of it in these types of accounts. Saving, of course, is essential – but try to find ways for your cash to work a bit harder to outrun inflation.


[i] https://www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/related/inflation-calculator/
[ii] http://canada.autonews.com/article/20180208/CANADA/180209785/average-price-of-new-car-rose-again-last-year-but-at-slower-pace
[iii] https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-402-x/2011000/chap/prices-prix/prices-prix02-eng.htm
[iv] https://globalnews.ca/news/3478535/why-is-canadas-inflation-rate-so-low-when-life-is-so-expensive/
[v] & [vi] https://www.inflation.eu/inflation-rates/canada/historic-inflation/cpi-inflation-canada.aspx

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Sizing them up – how do four generations compare financially?

September 24, 2018

Sizing them up – how do four generations compare financially?

It’s probably safe to say that how we see the world financially is partly due to our age, but also a product of how we see the world itself, including our prospects for the future.

Perspectives drive financial decisions just as much as the math – and may perhaps have an even greater effect than we realize.

Here’s a quick breakdown on how recent generations are grouped by birth year:

Boomers: 1946 to 1964
Generation X: 1965 to 1976
Millennials: 1977 to 1995
Generation Z: 1996 or later

With Boomers leading other generations by up to 50 years – or even longer – it’s not surprising that there are some stark differences in financial statistics – including net worth, savings rates, home ownership, and household debt.

When it comes to savings, nobody does it better than Boomers. A 2017 survey found that Boomers had more stashed away in savings than younger generations, with people age 65 and over having the highest amounts saved.[i] Nearly 40% of seniors surveyed had over $10,000 saved. Older GenXers followed, with nearly 25% having over $10,000 saved. By contrast, only 13% of young Millennials had over $10,000 in savings, with 67% having less than $1,000 saved, and nearly half having nothing saved at all. (It should be noted that older generations have had more time to save, which may give some insight into the weaker stats for younger generations.)

It’s early in the game, but GenZ, the youngest generation, may end up showing everyone else how it’s done when it comes to savings. Over 20% of this tech-savvy and financially prudent generation has had a savings account since age 10.[ii]

Renting versus home ownership is another area of wide divergence. Millennials outpace older generations when it comes to the nation’s population of renters. Of the nearly 46 million households that rent, 40% are headed by Millennials.[iii] However, 93% of Millennials state that they’d like to own a home – someday. Evidence suggests that some Millennials who have been biding their time are starting to see opportunity in real estate. In recent years, Millennials have been the largest group of home buyers, representing 40% of the buyers. This has been fueled in part by investment real estate purchases.[iv]

Younger generations have the benefit of seeing the household effects of debt in a financial downturn. They have witnessed that debt doesn’t go away when unemployment goes up or family members lose jobs. Although credit utilization is up, credit card debt for Millennials is only about half of the amount carried by Boomers and GenXers, and GenZ is even lower at just over a quarter of the credit card debt carried by Boomers and GenXers, both of which have similar credit card debt burdens.

Conventional wisdom tells us we learn from our elders. But perhaps the truth is that we can learn from every generation, each with its own perspectives driving their financial decisions.


[i] https://www.gobankingrates.com/saving-money/savings-advice/half-americans-less-savings-2017/
[ii] http://3pur2814p18t46fuop22hvvu.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/The-State-of-Gen-Z-2017-White-Paper-c-2017-The-Center-for-Generational-Kinetics.pdf
[iii] http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/06/5-facts-about-millennial-households/
[iv] https://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecarter/2017/07/26/how-real-estate-investing-is-spurring-millennial-home-ownership/#5931ba68d445

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The Millennials Are Coming, the Millennials Are Coming!

February 12, 2018

The Millennials Are Coming, the Millennials Are Coming!

Didn’t do so well in history at school? No worries.

Here’s an historical fact that’s easy to remember. Millennials are the largest generation in both Canada and the US. Ever. Even larger than the Baby Boomers. In Canada, those born between the years 1980 to 2000 number over 9.5M¹ and in the US, 92M.² These numbers dwarf the generation before them: Generation X at 7.2M in Canada and 61M in the US.

When you’re talking about nearly a third of the population of North America, it would seem that anything related to this group is going to have an effect on the rest of the population and the future.

Here are a few examples:

  • Millennials prefer to get married a bit later than their parents. (Will they also delay having children?)
  • Millennials prefer car sharing vs. car ownership. (What does this mean for the auto industry? For the environment?)
  • Millennials have an affinity for technology and information. (What “traditional ways of doing things” might fall by the wayside?)
  • Millennials are big on health and wellness. (Will this generation live longer than previous ones?)

It’s interesting to speculate and predict what may occur in the future, but what effects are happening now? Well, for one, if you’re a Millennial, you may have noticed that companies have been shifting aggressively to meet your needs.³ Simply put, if a company doesn’t have a website or an app that a Millennial can dig into, it’s probably not a company you’ll be investing any time or money in. This may be a driving force behind the technological advancements companies have made in the last decade – Millennials need, want, and use technology. All. The. Time. This means that whatever matters to you as a Millennial, companies may have no choice but to listen, take note, and innovate.

If you’re either in business for yourself or work for a company that’s planning to stay viable for the next 20-30 years, it might be a good idea to pay attention to the habits and interests of this massive group (if you’re not already). The Baby Boomers are already well into retirement, and the next wave of retirees will be Generation X, which will leave the Millennials as the majority of the workforce. There will come a time when this group will control most of the wealth in Canada and the US. This means that if you’re not offering what they need or want now, then there’s a chance that one day your product or service may not be needed or wanted by anyone. Perhaps it’s time to consider how your business can adapt and evolve.

Ultimately, this shift toward Millennials and what they’re looking for is an exciting time to gauge where our society will be moving in the next few decades, and what it’s going to mean for the financial industry.


Sources: ¹ Norris, Doug. “Millennials: The Newest, Biggest, and Most Diverse Target Market.” Environics Analytics, 2015, http://www.environicsanalytics.ca/docs/default-source/eauc2015-presentations/dougnorris-afternoonplenary.pdf?sfvrsn=6%20. ² “Millennials: Coming of Age.” Goldman Sachs, 2018, http://www.goldmansachs.com/our-thinking/pages/millennials/. ³ Ehlers, Kelly. “May We Have Your Attention: Marketing To Millennials.” Forbes, 6.27.2017, https://www.forbes.com/sites/yec/2017/06/27/may-we-have-your-attention-marketing-to-millennials/#409e42331d2f.

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Putting a Wrap On the Sandwich Generation

January 16, 2018

Putting a Wrap On the Sandwich Generation

Ever heard of the “Sandwich Generation”?

Unfortunately, it’s not a group of financially secure, middle-aged foodies whose most important mission is hanging out in the kitchens of their paid-off homes, brainstorming ideas about how to make the perfect sandwich. The Sandwich Generation refers to adults who find themselves in the position of financially supporting their grown children and their own parents, all while trying to save for their futures. They’re “sandwiched” between caring for both the older generation and the younger generation.

Can you relate to this? Do you feel like a PB&J that was forgotten at the bottom of a 2nd grader’s backpack?

If you feel like a sandwich, here are 3 tips to help put a wrap on that:

1. Have a plan. In an airplane, the flight attendants instruct us to put on our own oxygen mask before helping someone else put on theirs – this means before anyone, even your children or your elderly parents. Put your own mask on first. This practice is designed to help keep you and everyone else safe. Imagine if half the plane passed out from lack of oxygen because everyone neglected themselves while trying to help other people. When it comes to potentially having to support your kids and your parents, a tailored financial strategy that includes life insurance and contributing to a retirement fund will help you get your own affairs in order first, so that you can help care for your loved ones next.

2. Increase your income. For that sandwich, does it feel like there’s never enough mayonnaise? You’re always trying to scrape that last little bit from the jar. Increasing your income would help stock your pantry (figuratively, and also literally) with an extra jar or two. Options for a 2nd career are everywhere, and many entrepreneurial opportunities let you set your own hours and pace. Working part-time as your own boss while helping to get out of the proverbial panini press? Go for it!

3. Start dreaming again. You may have been in survival mode for so long that you’ve forgotten you once had dreams. What would you love to do for yourself or your family when you have the time and money? Take that vacation to Europe? Build that addition on to the house? Own that luxury car you’ve always wanted? Maybe you’d like to have enough leftover to help others pursue their goals.

It’s never too late to get the ball rolling on any of these steps. When you’re ready, feel free to give me a call. We can work together to quickly prioritize how you can start feeling less like baloney and more like a Monte Cristo.


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Getting a Degree of Financial Security

October 30, 2017

Getting a Degree of Financial Security

The financial advantage gap between having a college degree and just having a high school diploma is widening!

A 20-year study in Canada revealed that a man with a bachelor’s degree made an average of $732,000 than the average high school graduate. This is the widest gap between the two that the Economic Policy Institute has recorded since 1973!

While a college grad may encounter a type of retirement savings roadblock different from a reduced income – student loan debt – the earning numbers above show that the advantages of having a college degree and a solid financial strategy outweigh the retirement saving power of not having a college degree.

But here’s an issue plaguing both groups: more than two-thirds of Canadian millennials surveyed said they were “not at all knowledgeable” about retirement savings plans.

Regardless of your level of education or your level of income, you can save for your retirement – and take steps toward your financial independence. Or maybe even finance a college education for yourself or a loved one down the road.

A good first step to getting your earning power to work for you is meeting with a financial professional who can help put you on the path to a solid financial strategy. Contact me today, and together we can explore your options.