Kim Lowrie

Kim Lowrie

1 (905) 605 1427

Financial Professional

8787 WESTON ROAD
UNIT 16A and 17A
Vaughan, ON L4L 0C3

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December 12, 2018

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How inflation can affect your savings

October 1, 2018

How inflation can affect your savings

Even before we leave childhood behind, we become aware of a decrease in buying power.

It seems like that candy bar in the check-out lane has doubled in price without doubling in size. Unlike the value of stocks, real estate, or similar assets, candy doesn’t appreciate in value. What has happened is that your money has depreciated in value. Inflation has a sneaky way of eating away our money over time, forcing us to either find a way to earn more – or to get by with less. Even for the youngest of Generation Z, now in their early teens, consumer prices have increased about 30% since they were born.[i]

In 2018, the average new car costs $33,464 – up $1,034 since the previous year, or about 3.2%.[ii] While a $1,034 increase in a single year might seem high, the inflation rate (as a percentage) is lower than for many other items. And some other items may not have gone up as much as you would expect. For example, in 1935, a dozen eggs cost about 31 cents. By 2008, the average cost was about $2.57.[iii] But if eggs had followed the average rate of inflation, the price for a dozen would be nearly $6.00 by now. Supply, demand, and more efficient production and distribution all contribute to a lower price than expected with the egg example. The Canadian government uses what is called a Consumer Price Index (CPI) to measure inflation, but many say it still does not truly reflect the modern cost of living[iv] – making the true rate of inflation more difficult to determine.

Inflation is due to several reasons, all with complex relationships to each other. At the heart of the matter is money supply. If there is more money in circulation, prices go up. Under the current monetary system, which utilizes a Central Bank to govern monetary policy, inflation rates have been as low as 0% annually in 1961 to 12.2% in 1981.[v] That means something that cost $10 in 1980 cost $11.22 just a year later. That may not seem like a big increase on $10, but if you’re like most people, your pay probably doesn’t go up 12.2% in a year for doing the same work!

How does inflation affect my savings strategy?
It’s a good idea to always keep the current rate of inflation in the back of your mind. As of July, 2018, it was about 2.99%.[vi] Interest rates paid by banks and GICs are usually lower than the inflation rate, which might mean you’ll lose money if you leave most of it in these types of accounts. Saving, of course, is essential – but try to find ways for your cash to work a bit harder to outrun inflation.


[i] https://www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/related/inflation-calculator/
[ii] http://canada.autonews.com/article/20180208/CANADA/180209785/average-price-of-new-car-rose-again-last-year-but-at-slower-pace
[iii] https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-402-x/2011000/chap/prices-prix/prices-prix02-eng.htm
[iv] https://globalnews.ca/news/3478535/why-is-canadas-inflation-rate-so-low-when-life-is-so-expensive/
[v] & [vi] https://www.inflation.eu/inflation-rates/canada/historic-inflation/cpi-inflation-canada.aspx

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Retirement Mathematics 101: How Much Will You Need?

Retirement Mathematics 101: How Much Will You Need?

Have you ever wondered how someone could actually retire?

The main difference between a strictly unemployed person and a retiree: A retiree has replaced their income somehow. This can be done in a variety of ways including (but not limited to):

  • Saving up a lump sum of money and withdrawing from it regularly
  • Receiving a pension from the company you worked for or from the government (Social Security in the US and Canadian Pension Plan in Canada)
  • Or an annuity you purchased that pays out an amount regularly

For the example below, let’s assume you don’t have a pension from your company nor benefits from the government. In this scenario, your retirement would be 100% dependent on your savings.

The amount you require to successfully retire is dependent on two main factors:

  1. The annual income you desire during retirement
  2. The length of retirement

To keep things simple, say you want to retire at 65 years old with the same retirement income per year as your pre-retirement income per year – $50,000. According to the World Bank, the average life expectancy in the US is 79 and in Canada is 82 as of 2015.¹ Let’s split the difference and call it 80 for our example which means we should plan for income for a minimum of 15 years. (For our purposes here we’re going to disregard the impact of inflation and taxes to keep our math simple.) With that in mind, this would be the minimum amount we would need saved up by age 60:

  • $50,000 x 15 years = $750,000

There it is: to retire with a $50,000 annual income for 15 years, you’d need to save $750,000. The next challenge is to figure out how to get to that number (if you’re not already there) the most efficient way you can. The more time you have, the easier it can be to get to that number since you have more time for contributions and account growth.

If this number seems daunting to you, you’re not alone. The mean savings amount for American families with members between 56-61 is $163,577² and for Canadian families the average is $184,000³ - both of which are nearly half a million dollars off our theoretical retirement number. Using these actual savings numbers, even if you decided to live a thriftier lifestyle of $20,000 or $30,000 per year, that would mean you could retire for 8-9 years max!

All of this info may be hard to hear the first time, but it’s the first real step to preparing for your retirement. Knowing your number gives you an idea about where you want to go. After that, it’s figuring out a path to that destination. If retirement is one of the goals you’d like to pursue, let’s get together and figure out a course to get you there – no math degree required!


Sources: ¹ “Life expectancy at birth, total (years).” The World Bank, 2018, http://bit.ly/2I8w4gk. ² Elkins, Kathleen. “Here’s how much the average family in their 50s has saved for retirement.” CNBC, 4.21.2017, http://cnb.cx/2FX0Ckx. ³ Chevreau, Jonathan. “The magic number for retirement savings is $756,000, according to poll of Canadians.” Financial Post, 2.18.2018, http://bit.ly/2sjYQ9W.

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The Black Hole of Checking (Part 1)

January 16, 2018

The Black Hole of Checking (Part 1)

What’s the difference between a black hole and a checking account?

One is a massive void with a force so strong that anything that enters it is stretched and stretched, then disappears with a finality that not even NASA scientists fully understand.

… And the other is a black hole.

Joking aside, did you know that a black hole and your checking account actually have a lot in common? Spaghettification is the technical term for what would happen to an object in space if it happens to find itself too close to a black hole.* The intense gravity would stretch the object into a thin noodle, past the point of no return.

If you don’t have a solid financial strategy, the money in your checking account may be stretched past the point of no return, too. Why? If your money is sitting in “The Black Hole of Checking” for years on end, you may find that as you get closer to retirement, each dollar is spread thinner and thinner (until it disappears).

Where are you storing your retirement fund? If you’re keeping it in your checking account, instead of growing your money, you might just be stretching it impossibly, uncomfortably thin.

Say you already have $10,000 saved for your retirement. A checking account comes with a 0% interest rate. That means a $0 rate of return. Even if you managed to not touch that money for 10 years, you’d still only have your starting amount of $10,000. With inflation, you’d really have less value at the end of the 10 years than you had to start with.

But if you took that $10,000 and put it into an account with a 3% compounding interest rate, after 10 years, your money will have grown to $13,439. And that’s without adding another penny! Can you imagine what kind of growth is possible if you start saving now and contribute regularly to an account with a compounding interest rate?

This is the power of compounding interest – interest paid on interest plus the initial amount. (This is also a huge reason why getting as high of an interest rate as you can is important!)

So what are you waiting for? If all of your money is disappearing into that Black Hole of Checking, maybe this is the exploding star “sign” you’ve been looking for! Don’t “spaghettify” your money. Do the opposite and give it the chance to grow with the power of compound interest.


Source: Curiosity Staff. “Black Holes Might Cause Spaghettification.” Curiosity,* 8.31.2015, https://curiosity.com/topics/black-holes-might-cause-spaghettification/.

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